Outlying Districts
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Outlying Districts

Poems by Anselm Hollo

“. . . it is in the short lyrics where Hollo excels, with a sense of line derived from Williams and Creeley and a sense of humor straight from the New York school, he captures the possibilities of transient moments, becoming both commentator and object of comment.” —John Stickney, Small Press

January 1990
6 x 9 | 112 pages
Paperback Original

ISBN: 978-0-918273-76-5.

$8.95

Description

Hollo’s witty, cosmopolitan, self-deprecating lyrics inspires trust in his original blend of ironic wit & sentimentality.

Anselm Hollo views all of his work as one unbroken song, and in his new collection of poems, Outlying Districts, the music continues to resonate. Hus understated and occasionally self-deprecating lyrics (“fill in the blank is bigger than 20 poets”) has established Hollo as a credible contemporary voice that is not about to deliver phony nuggets of wisdom. Thus when Hollo writes “that grace still exists,” we believe him. A master at blending ironic wit and sentimentality, Hollo’s work never loses its bittersweet sense of song.

Reviews

“Hollo is an epic poet . . . . Against explosions of carnage and fear, there is a persistence that is as close to heroic as I can imagine. It continues! Improvisational humor, smarter’n paint, counterpoints a profoundly moral pulse. Equity. Compassion. Tenderness. He writes . . . out of hipness that knows staying alive was always a matter of exploiting the unexpected.” —St. Mark’s Poetry Project Newsletter

“For three decades Anselm Hollo has been an important figure on the intercultural poetry scene. In Outlying Districts we see how his original work has been enriched, both technically and in content, by the contact he has had with European poets through his impressive translations.” —James Laughlin

“. . . it is in the short lyrics where Hollo excels, with a sense of line derived from Williams and Creeley and a sense of humor straight from the New York school, he captures the possibilities of transient moments, becoming both commentator and object of comment.” —John Stickney, Small Press

“Andselm Hollo’s so sly and subtle he almost melts in your mind.” —Richard Silberg, Poetry Flash