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The Blue Girl

A novel by Laurie Foos

July 14, 2015 • 5.5 x 8.25 • 220 Pages • 978-1-56689-399-2

A blue girl lives in the woods, eating secrets baked into moon pies, and shaking up a small lakeside town.

In this small lakeside town, mothers bake their secrets into moon pies they feed to a silent blue girl. Their daughters have secrets too—that they can’t sleep, that they might sleep with a neighbor boy, that they know more than they let on. But when the daughters find the blue girl, everyone’s carefully held silences shake loose.

About the Author

Laurie Foos is the author of Ex Utero, Portrait of the Walrus by a Young Artist, Twinship, Bingo Under the Crucifix, Before Elvis There Was Nothing, and The Giant Baby. She teaches in the low residency MFA program at Lesley University and in the low residency BFA program at Goddard College. She lives on Long Island with her husband and two children. Visit her website at www.lauriefoos.net.


Thanks to a 2013 ADA Access Improvement Grant administered by VSA Minnesota for the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, this title is also formatted for screen readers which make text accessible to the blind and visually impaired. To purchase this title for use with a screen reader please call (612) 338-0125 or email us at info@coffeehousepress.org.

Reviews

“With spare prose and a keen ear for the clipped interactions of people in denial . . . Foos untangles the troublesome knot that binds the families together one kinked strand at a time. Foos effortlessly inserts a humanized sin-eater into the center of a complex, emotionally volatile group of families, creating a work that is haunting and healing in equal measure.” —Kirkus

“Foos’ prose has an ethereal quality as she describes the person in the woods, and the allure surrounding her always. . . . This novel is not so much a puzzle to be solved as it is an experience to be had. Something to be tasted and consumed, crumbs falling by the wayside along with our useless insecurities.” NPR

“Foos has found her way into a different kind of surrealist story, one in which the prose has a rhythmic lilt, one that never rushes, but lingers inside the minds of the characters, uncovers their secrets one by one, and floats on their interweaving narratives.” —Newfound Journal

“[The Blue Girl] winds beautiful prose with the stark, sorrowful imagery of loss, misunderstanding, and the ever-tightening, close-to-breaking ties of family.” —Full Stop

“Told in alternating points of view, The Blue Girl explores how these relationships both define and confine each of the women. Foos has crafted a surreal story that is suffocating yet utterly compelling.” —Shelf Awareness

The Blue Girl such an emotionally driven experience is the elegant language and creative use of metaphor. . . . I recommend Laurie Foos’ The Blue Girl as a novel that tells a familiar story of grief in a unique way through an incredibly genuine set of female voices.” —Blotterature

“Laurie Foos is a weird Midas—everything she touches turns strange. . . .  Each novel is as hysterical, weird, and heartbreaking as the last.” The Rumpus

“Inventively told from six perspectives, Laurie Foos’s engaging novel The Blue Girl is a surreal yet very readable account of secrets and despair.” —Largehearted Boy

“The prose is clean, exacting and approachable, which makes the arrangement of the book—and the swirling vortex of complicated psychologies—even more impressive and heartbreaking.” —Star Tribune 

“Reading Laurie Foos’ The Blue Girl is like peering into someone else’s dream . . . an entrancing experience.” Nomadic Press

“Part fantasy, totally fantastical, this is a book that will give your sweet tooth a twinge of the rottenness . . . and a taste of the dark secrets unsaid, especially those between mothers and daughters.” The Riveter

“To put it plainly, Laurie Foos has written a stunning novel about despair.” Entropy

“If The Blue Girl resists the gratifications of ‘realism’ and its click-shut resolutions, she goes further by using language to let us experience the desires embedded in our deprivations.” —On the Seawall

“At turns lyrical, absurd, and heartbreaking, her fabulist novel about this strange blue girl explores the strangeness in all of us.” —Memorious Blog

“Strangely beautiful. . . . Foos’s talent for both subtle and fantastical imagery, the novel really feels like an unpredictable and emotional thrill ride.” —NewPages

“Foos strikes a brilliant balance in acknowledging common similarities while also infusing her novel with overarching themes and big questions, all wrapped up in her fantastical blue girl.” —River City Reading

The Blue Girl such an emotionally driven experience is the elegant language and creative use of metaphor. . . . I recommend Laurie Foos’ The Blue Girl as a novel that tells a familiar story of grief in a unique way through an incredibly genuine set of female voices.” Blottature

“Although the premise is fantastical, Foos grounds it in the relationships (and secrets) within families, especially between mothers and daughters.” —BookPage

“Laurie Foos has a knack for the surreal with a side of feminism.” Dame Magazine

“A strange dark modern day fairy tale. . . . Dreamlike and sensory.” —KAXE Northern Community Radio

“The novel deeply understands what it is to be a woman struggling with her role as wife and mother. . . . [It] impresses on its readers the strength that a secret can tangibly and physically carry—enough weight to make up an ingredient in a cake.” —Samantha Preddie